Canada and the World Pavilion / Pavillon Canada Monde 1999-2001

The Canada and the World Pavilion was a small museum in Ottawa that was designed and built in 2001. Exhibits were devoted to Canada's contribution to sport, arts and culture, development, peacekeeping, and science. Interactive exhibits, activities, and special events were held during several years at the facility and in the surrounding parkland.
With spectacular views to the north, the building overlooks the historic Rideau Falls and the Ottawa River. At 50 Sussex Drive, it is the next-door neighbour to the Embassy of France. After several years of mediocre attendance, the facility closed in the fall of 2005.
Some of the Canadian achievements highlighted in the museum were:

  • Canada peacekeeping missions in Bosnia, Rwanda, Haiti, Somalia, Cyprus, Congo etc.
  • Discovery of insulin for the treatment of diabetes. Frederick Banting and Charles Best of Toronto, 1922. Awarded the Nobel Prize, Medicine, 1923.
  • Characterization of free radicals: A free radical is a very short-lived molecule that has an extra pair of electrons that it tries desperately to share with another molecule to form yet a third compound.
  • Invention of the CCD chip for camcorders and telescopes. The CCD or Charge Coupled Device is a microchip that takes light and converts it into digital data that can be manipulated by computers and electronics to form images.
  • Development of computerized weather forecasting systems now used worldwide. These systems use complex mathematical models of the Earth's atmosphere in three dimensions as well as time. Developed by Roger Daley. Born in London, England, 1943, grew up in West Vancouver, B.C., developed his theories in Montreal and Boulder Colorado, 1970s - 1990s.
  • Discovery of stem cells, whereby a single type of cell has the ability to divide and grow to regenerate any kind of human body tissue. Discovered in 1963 by James Till and Ernest McCulloch at the Ontario Cancer Institute in Toronto.
  • IMax Movie System was co-invented by Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, and Robert Kerr in 1968
  • Basketball was invented by James Naismith in 1891
  • Ice Hockey was invented in 19th Century Canada
  • The first practical electron microscope was built by James Hillier and Arthur Prebus in 1939.
  • The garbage bag was invented by Harry Wasylyk, 1950
  • The Robertson screw (also known as a square screw) was invented by P.L. Robertson in 1908
  • Sonar was invented by Reginald Fessenden
  • The Canadarm was developed by staff of the SPAR Aerospace (1981)
  • The Walkie-Talkie was invented by Donald L. Hings and Alfred J. Gross for military use. (1942)

The original intention of the NCC was to build the museum right on top of the existing electric generator building next to Rideau Falls to benefit from this extraordinary view, but the conditions imposed by the company that exploits the generator were deemed to be unreasonable by the NCC. Therefore, the museum was built next to the existing building and extended into the basement that offered a very large space.

[click] The project's concept presentation portfolio (pdf)

[click] Portfolio de la présentation du concept du projet (pdf)

Images

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Site location next to Rideau Falls. A few design-build project development firms were invited to submit a proposal for the future pavilion.

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Proposed project by Griffith Rankin Cook (selected project)

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Proposed project by Jack Diamond

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Proposed project by Schoeler Lundya

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Preliminary design by Griffith Rankin Cook

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Ground-breaking (Marcel Beaudry, center, NCC President and Mauril Bélanger (left) federal MP

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Construction begins in 2000

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image Canada and the World Pavilion

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image Canada and the World Pavilion interior

canada and the world pavilion interior exhibit

Museum interior exhibit

1995 Images, before the construction of the Pavilion