Champlain's Port Royal Habitation, NS

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“In the 1920s, the Historical Association of Annapolis Royal systematically began acquiring and transferring to the Government of Canada various small plots of land at Lower Granville (as it was then called) which had been positively identified as comprising the actual site of the Habitation; a cairn was erected in 1924 to mark the location and its history.

Determined individuals such as L.M. Fortier, Harriet Taber Richardson and E.K. Eaton continued to promote preservation of the site, securing expert archaeological and historical advice and lobbying the government of Canada for support. Their efforts were rewarded in 1938, when Ottawa agreed to reconstruct the Habitation as a federal public-works project designed to stimulate local employment during the Depression.

Reconstructed and furnished according to the standards and best practices then known to archaeologists, restoration architects and material-culture specialists, the Habitation was the centrepiece of Canada's new Port Royal National Park. This was one of the earliest built-heritage projects undertaken in Canada, and the community support which nurtured it evidenced a vibrant and growing interest in public history.
The official opening was on 4 July 1941. Some 500 guests listened as dignitaries celebrated the achievement; Evangeline was sung in French - followed by There'll always be an England; and the ceremonies were recorded by CBC Radio for later broadcast nationally. Among the official party was D.C. Harvey, Provincial Archivist for Nova Scotia, a member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, and closely involved with the project throughout its life — from inception and design, to dealing with the aftermath.”
From: Nova Scotia Archives http://novascotia.ca/archives/virtual/habitation/

In the early 1970s, architect Ronald M. Peck from Wolfville, Nova Scotia joined the team of Restoration Services Division in Ottawa. A few years before becoming an architect, Ron had worked on the reconstruction of the Port Royal Habitation. While studying architecture at McGill University in Montreal, he wrote “An account of the Port Royal Habitation, Lower Granville dealing with its history and restoration.” It was submitted in February 1940 to the School of Architecture, McGill University in lieu of Summer Reading requirements. The report is well illustrated.

[click] An account of the Port Royal Habitation, Lower Granville dealing with its history and restoration.

Images from the 1940s

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